Skip to main content

Windows DLL Injection Vulnerability

Most of the security world has now heard about the vulnerability that was reported by hdmoore regarding the linking of malicious dll files by using remote shares in the windows filesystem.  This issue has also been discussed at slashdot by many users.

Since metasploit is constantly updated with the latest public exploits, I decided to try this one out to see how easy it really is on the Windows 7 platform.  Here is the coles notes and results of my attempts.

1.  Prep my test environment.  I use a Windows 7 box fully patched running Windows Defender as my primary Windows work environment.  I also have the convenience of using VMware fusion to virtualize the environment so it was easy to clone my installation to create a sample copy.  I made sure to use the host-only networking so I can isolate the Windows box with metasploit.

2.  I updated my metasploit environment running on my OSX host.  A quick svn update gave me the latest code.  Version 10133 checked out.

3.  I opened msfconsole and loaded the "windows/browser/webdav_dll_hijacker" exploit.  I also set the payload to be the "windows/meterpreter/reverse_tcp" to get an interactive session with the exploited box.  You need to set some options to have it work, so I set the RHOST and SRVHOST variables to my internal host IP address 192.168.32.1.

4.  The last option to set is with the exploit, and I chose to give the file extension ppt and pptx for the exploited file to trigger an opening of Microsoft's Powerpoint application.  This names the resulting files to policy.ppt and policy.pptx.

5.  Type "exploit" and my listener is started and a webserver is created to host the two exploitable files.

6.  On the Windows 7 box, I enter "http://192.168.1.32/documents/" into the address bar.  The browser notices that this is a webdav supported server and loads explorer to display the remote files in the browser window.

7.  Double clicking on the ppt file alerts me that the browser is trying to access a share that requires additional privileges and asks me to confirm the operation, which I do - I really want to test the exploit!

8.  I choose allow to accept the executable attempt to run, and the exploit is run on the Windows 7 box.  I confirm by checking that there is an active session in meterpreter.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Consumer Benefits of Credit Card Security

Recently, new types of credit card security features have be debuted, such as this one from Visa. And as some of the comments on Bruce Schneier's blog point out, its questionable how effective this is. I want to figure out what the motivation is behind these ideas, as it appears banks and the major credit card brands are not completely transparent about the benefits to the consumer. My example is this, one source has that in 2005 $2.8 million was lost due to credit card fraud from Visa and MasterCard in Canada alone. These costs are absorbed by the credit card companies as they protect their cardholders from liability, but as can be expected these costs are directly applied to the card brand customers, people and merchants, in the form of fees and interest rates. Now lets say that card brands can deploy a technology to eliminate 90% of this fraud and associated insurance and liability costs. Likely a large savings both in Canada and globally. Would we, the public and mercha

OpenSolaris, ZFS, iSCSI and OSX - Creative Storage - Part II

In part I of this post, I looked at the simple steps required to setup a relatively simple storage solution using OpenSolaris, ZFS, iSCSI and OSX. This was about a month ago, and I've made some significant changes on how this is used for me. At the end of the last post I left off on the part dealing with configuration of the iSCSI initiator side of the solution. I stopped here because there were some issues related to the installation and use of the software. The iSCSI initiator that I was using was Studio Network Solutions GlobalSAN initiator (version 3.3.0.43) which is used to allow for connections to their products. This software will also allow for connections to ANY iSCSI target! After the configuration of the iSCSI target on the ZFS pool, and installation of the client it was trivial to get the connection established with the storage pool, and it showed up in OSX as a raw disk which had not been formatted. I proceeded to format the disk as HFS+ and it then mounted as a lo

May Security Catch-up

Its been much too long since my last post - Sony's PSN network has been breached a few times , a record number of vulnerabilities have been published , and the US government has released a new set of cyber space strategies . On the cool tools and technologies there have been lots of notable releases: Some research from Albert Cotesi New Zealand on the traffic flowing from IOS to 3rd parties, now sniffable thanks to MITMProxy , and instructions on getting it working with IOS As always SQLmap is making life easier for the vulnerability assessor and pen-tester. Microsoft has released an updated to the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit - I'll be looking into this over the next few weeks, and how it can be applied practically. New major version of Backtrack also released, for those of you that are still relying upon live-cd's as a source for tools.