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Cinco DNSSEC Mayo

For many, the switch on May 5th to the new DNSSEC support in the root server pool is long overdue, for others the swich has people jumpy dreaming up reasons why this will "kill your internet". While Keith Mitchell, head of engineering at root server operator Internet Systems Consortium says "No-one is going to completely lose Internet service as a result of the signed root -- or indeed any DNSSEC deployment efforts -- and I certainly didn't say that it," he says of the Register story. "The worst that is going to happen is that a tiny minority of users behind mis-configured firewall or middleware boxes may experience some performance degradation when their clients have to attempt alternative paths for resolving names," says Mitchell.

As defined by DNSSEC.net "it was designed to protect the Internet from certain attacks, such as DNS cache poisoning [0]. It is a set of extensions to DNS, which provide: a) origin authentication of DNS data, b) data integrity, and c) authenticated denial of existence."

This is intended to protect people from far worse things (phishing, DNS poisoning, rewriting, etc) than having to resolve names through alternate servers. For an easier description wikipedia as always has us covered.

Happy Cinco DNSSEC Mayo!

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